Maku-Maku Lake - Peru

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Maku-Maku Lake - PeruLevel 58
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Maku-Maku Lake - Peru
Charts
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The most productive fishing time is around early morning and late evening, when the sun is quite low.

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In this weather fish bites are overall very promising, but the best time is around late morning and early evening.

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In such weather fish are less active in the morning with their activity gradually growing as the day moves on, reaching its peak late in the evening.

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Fees
Travel fee
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15000
Fishing fee (per day)
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1500


Welcome to the tropical paradize! There aren't many wild places left on earth, and Lake Maku-Maku is one of them. Located in the north-east of Peru, it is one of the hundreds of lakes drained into the Amazon’s many tributaries. Apart from the indigenous population and rare tourists, the place is almost empty. The jungle and high luxuriant grass encroach onto the lake, which often makes landing difficult. You can navigate your boat along the lake’s narrow streams and into the flooded forest. Remember at all times that you are in the middle of a real rainforest, so be ready to get caught in a downpour, be startled by a screeching monkey or a cayman brushing past the side of your boat. Deep bottom lies beneath muddy standing waters. There are occasional 30-feet-deep pits in some areas of the lake bed. You can also fish in the wide shoals and backwaters. It’s not easy to get to Lake Maku-Maku, but all your efforts will be rewarded with the ultimately breathtaking fishing experience! It is home to almost two dozen fish species, the unique dwellers of Amazonia who boast gigantic sizes and whimsical colorations. The humongous Arapaima, the sharp-toothed Payara, the ribbon-shaped Arowana, the brightly colored Sorubim Catfish and the bloodthirsty Piranha are just some of the inhabitants of these abundant waters!

Licenses

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Basic License

Available from level 58

1 day
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5000

MUST BE RELEASED:
Silver Croaker (trophy, unique). Arapaima (trophy). Silver Arowana (trophy, unique). Flag-Tailed Prochilodus (trophy, unique). Brycon (trophy, unique). Biara (trophy, unique). Payara (trophy, unique). Redeye Piranha (trophy). Red-Bellied Piranha (trophy, unique). Ripsaw Catfish (trophy, unique). Spotted Aracu (trophy, unique). Jacunda (trophy, unique), Oscar (trophy, unique), Flatwhiskered Catfish (trophy, unique), Sorubim (trophy, unique). Gilded Catfish (trophy). Butterfly Peacock Bass (trophy, unique)

MUST BE TAKEN:
No restrictions

PROHIBITED SPECIES:
No restrictions

NIGHT CATCH:
Forbidden

BOAT FISHING:
Forbidden

3 days
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14200
Week
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31500
Month
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120000
Unlimited
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1000
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Advanced License

Available from level 58

1 day
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10000

MUST BE RELEASED:
No restrictions

MUST BE TAKEN:
No restrictions

PROHIBITED SPECIES:
No restrictions

NIGHT CATCH:
Allowed

BOAT FISHING:
Boats & kayaks allowed

3 days
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28500
Week
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63000
Month
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240000
Unlimited
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2000


Starting points

Tourist Landing Pier

Tourist Landing Pier

Surrounded by miles of jungles, this might be the only pocket of civilization in the area. A small hill on the lake’s southern shore provides an ideal camping site. Welcoming and cosy summer lodges and comfortable bungalows have been built specially for tourists. Follow the neat wooden stairs from the house to the new pier. There you will find simple aboriginal kayaks alongside beautiful modern boats. A perfect spot to relax and practice accurate casts in attempts to catch the countless Silver Croaker, the sizable Redeye Piranha or the swift Jacunda.

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Otorongo Village

Otorongo Village

A tiny indigenous village is almost indistinguishable from the thick jungle vegetation on the western shore of the lake. A scattering of modest traditional houses make up an organic part of the scenery. They are inherent to nature here, just like trees and rocks are. The Maku-Maku people are indeed children of the jungle. They are quiet and discreet, so most of the time you’ll think you are alone. Local anglers have built a pier out of logs, which now serves as a departure point for their boat trips. If you take your boat and go further west along the shore, you’ll come across the source of a small river. It means you might be lucky enough to encounter the predator fish species Payara or the Brycon fish eager to feast on the fruit fallen into the water.

Oval Island

Oval Island

There is an oblong island with a landing pier in the northern part of the lake. Tourist summer lodges with simple roofs peek out from among the lush rainforest vegetation. The calm and smooth water surface is only rippled by fish, and the dense humid air is filled with the ambience of the jungle. The northern part of the lake has many deep pits. So if you decide to fish straight from the island, try using tackle for large catfish — Sorubim Catfish, Gilded Catfish and Ripsaw Catfish all inhabit these waters. When the mist clears, you can see the opposite shore, densely covered with impenetrable jungle.

Competitions

Name

Species Description
Bloody Threat. Maku-Maku Lake - Peru Piranhas family The nasty Piranhas — they are the real bloody threat here. These ruthless predators will attack anything living, from a small fish to a monkey accidentally fallen into the water. But now the hunter became the hunted! Open the fishing season in the tropical wilderness of Maku-Maku Lake, Peru. Fish from the shore or take a boat to participate in this top-class competition. You will require all your skills for this challenge because Piranhas are agile and cunning. Using only float tackle, collect maximum points by catching as many of these fish as possible, or by landing the biggest one of them all. Remember that you are not allowed to use a rod stand during the competition. But you can release the fish after catching them — you’ll keep your points.
Living Fossil. Maku-Maku Lake - Peru Arapaima Arapaima is a real living fossil indeed! Consider yourself invited to a competitive dinosaur hunt: this fish is just as ancient. In addition, its size makes it the T-Rex of fish species. Arapaima looks like a 2-yard-long torpedo, and sometimes shows its head above the surface to breathe some air. Still here? Then get ready to join the hunt in the Peruvian jungle! Catch all forms of Arapaima using any tackle available to you. Think not only of quantity but also the quality of your catch. The victory is determined by the difference in weight of the biggest and the smallest of your catches. And remember that Arapaima is a prehistoric relic that deserves your respect. Give it a proper treatment and release it after catching it, because you will still keep all your points.
Trophy Whiskers. Maku-Maku Lake - Peru Catfish family Don’t let anyone to take your victory during this Trophy Whiskers Competition! Lake Maku-Maku in northern Peru has many bottom pits housing the long-whiskered catfish, but are you skilled enough to land one? Take your boat or stay on the shore, grab your best float or bottom tackle – and go for it! Every pound of the trophy catfish will get you points, which you keep even after you release your catch. Special glory awaits you for landing the biggest trophy catfish. Your recipe for success is easy: more catfish – more kilos – more points.
Maku-Maku Carnivores. Maku-Maku Lake - Peru Predator Fish Maku-Maku Carnivores sounds like a perfect horror movie title. But in our case it is a gripping action flick! Welcome to the hottest Maku-Maku competition. Its waters can be deceitfully peaceful, but they hide myriads of sharp-toothed predators for you to catch. Use spinning or casting tackle, fish from the shore or from a boat, and be sure to land as many kilos of Amazon predators as possible before the time ends. Or will you be that one lucky angler to catch the biggest fish? Good luck or, as they say it here, buena suerte!

Resident species